The Neon Museum

 

Last week,  I hopped onto a plane at Salt Lake International Airport and forty five minutes later, landed in Las Vegas, Nevada.  Now, I'm not a huge fan of the typical Vegas vacation.  Shopping, gambling, drinking and wandering through crowded and confusing casinos seems like a gentle hell to me.  So my mom, sister and I looked for some sights off the beaten path and the first place that came up was, The Neon Museum.  

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The Neon Museum is a museum of retired neon signs.   Yep, just about every time a hotel is bought, sold or rebranded the Neon Museum adds something new to the collection.  Essentially, The Neon Museum is the place where Las Vegas' neon signs go to rest. But somehow, in this outdoor boneyard of Vegas' neon past, these signs are reborn into beautiful sign-posts of bygone eras. We caught the last daylight tour, (they give tours at night and the signs are lit up) and it was so cool.  The tour guide talked about the history, design and technology of the most famous signs and each story was surprisingly interested.  This neon sign lens of Las Vegas history gave all of us on the tour some interesting insight and appreciation for the strange and sordid history of Las Vegas. 

As a design and marketing nerd and a total nostalgia junkie,  I was fascinated by the different eras of design we could see in each sign. From the Atomic Age design of the original Stardust sign to the Disney movie-inspired, giant skeleton head from Treasure Island, the last eighty years of graphic design can be viewed inside of this special little place. 

Here are some of the photos from our expedition.  PS - if you're thinking of visiting the museum- be sure to book your tour a day in advance.  The Neon Museum has a huge collection and they are expecting to expand in the next few years so they can show more of the these neon giants.

neon sign museum las vegas
neon museum las vegas
The stars of the old Stardust casino sign rising behind the old Treasure Island pirate.

The stars of the old Stardust casino sign rising behind the old Treasure Island pirate.

neon museum las vegas
neon museum las vegas
The sign from the Moulin Rouge, the hotel that paved the way to racial integration in Las Vegas.  It only stayed open for something like 2 months but it was ground breaking. 

The sign from the Moulin Rouge, the hotel that paved the way to racial integration in Las Vegas.  It only stayed open for something like 2 months but it was ground breaking. 

The Yucca Hotel sign, an early example of neon technology.  

The Yucca Hotel sign, an early example of neon technology.  

 

Building a Brand? BE YOURSELF

Last fall I attended a meet up for local entrepreneurs called "Marketing on a Shoestring Budget".  I didn't think about writing about it at the time but I learned something from one of the panelists that really stuck in my oversized marketing compartment of my brain.  So I thought I'd share his brilliant advice.

Here it goes. 

Three successful local entrepreneurs were asked to speak to the group about marketing. Each of the panelists introduced themselves and talked about how social media marketing has given them access to a much larger pool of customers.  It's also given them valuable information about what people like, what's working and what's not and where they need to expand.  

 Okay, so most of these technical aspects I was totally familiar with,  The really important information came from the owner of Jed's Barber Shop, a hip local, barber shop with an incredible social media following.  Jed's opened 5 years ago and has now opened a second successful (and now third) location.  

When Jed opened up his barber shop,  he set out to build a company that he would enjoy running.  And that, my friends is the simple but brilliant idea he based his branding upon. 

First, he asked himself, what do I enjoy? And his answer was,

"I like to have fun. I like to drink beer and I like to be around other people that like to have fun and drink beer!"   

Secondly, he asked himself, what am I good at?  and his answer was "I'm good at being funny"  and there was the second part of his marketing campaign, humor. 

And there he had it.  He would build his brand around humor, fun, beer and fun people who like to drink beer.  (Sounds pretty good to me!)

He started his campaign.   He set out to attract like minded people. People HE wanted to be around.  He used his humor to get the attention of fun people and he watched his social media influence grow and grow. 

By deciding who he was and what he liked, he built a brand to attract the kind of people that would also like these things.  Its brilliant.  I know, it seems simple but how many people, brands or companies build a brand this way?  When you do what comes naturally to you, what you enjoy, it's much easier to do the work!  We are always worried about being liked by everyone but what people really like and admire is other people being REAL, (as in really being who you are- as long as you're not a sociopath).  It's possible that you may lose a couple of customers or clients being you-  but in reality, you'll save yourself from the stress of working with someone who doesn't get you. 

If you're working on your brand, get to know who YOU are.   There's no point to building a brand and company that you don't love and that doesn't allow you the freedom to be yourself. 

Ask some questions.

  • What do I enjoy?  This matters! If you don't enjoy marketing the brand you've built, then it's not going to be as successful as you want it to be. 
  • What am I good at?  What comes naturally to you?  Use your assets! Don't force yourself to be anything you're not.  Inauthenticity reeks inauthenticity and no one wants to buy it. 
  • What can I do?  More importantly, what do you WANT to do?  

 

  

 

An Mid-Winter Adventure Doeth the Soul Good, like Medicine

Traveling, it's one of very favorite activities. Every trip starts off about the same, we pack up some clothing, something casual, something dressy, shoes for each occasion, sometimes shelter, (a tent), and in my case, way too much.  We lock up all the doors in the house, making sure there are some lights left on so that someone thinks we’re home. Then we take off into the unknown, in the car or on a plane, where anything can happen.  Really, there's nothing quite like a mid-winter escape to rejuvenate a cold, wintery soul. Travel gives us a chance to experience new people, places, smells and sights; some of which stay with us forever. 

On my most recent trip, I crowded onto a big plane headed to Los Angeles with actors, screaming children, business women and men and a few members of the bike gang, the "Mongols".  We waited for the wings to get de-iced with pink mystery chemicals, and then in certain uncertainty we took off into the air, soaring at 30,000 feet, with the plane bumping and floating and shaking over the stormy clouds.  

We landed in Los Angeles and I headed straight to the Los Angeles Art Show where my boyfriend’s artwork was on display with hundreds of other amazing artists.  The building was lined with people, taking photos, staring and curiously wandering from gallery to gallery, artwork to artwork. Through the crowds of people, the first site that caught my eye was an over-sized,  red, shining sculpture of a sumo wrestler.  

We wandered through the crowds to see the performance artist, Millie Brown lying naked on a bed of wilting flowers where she’d been laying in fast for 3 days while people hovered around her taking photos and  staring at her like the object she’d made herself. Her face was serene and unmoving as we approached. A child ran up to look at her closely and then ran back to the shelter of his parents only to venture a bit closer again. 

 
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As we wandered through more galleries, Brad showed me to an exhibit that he knew I would love.  It was a 4 artist show of Korean minimalist Dansaekwha paintings,  a genre I was unfamiliar with, (though apparently it’s sweeping the globe), but a style of painting that I am striving towards in my own work.  I was instantly taken in by these monochromatic minimalist style landscapes.  The artist I loved most based his paintings on visions he’d had when he was lost at sea at some time in his life.  He’d replicated a pattern over and over across the surface of the canvas in what appeared to be one color and monochromatic from a distance but upon further inspection was actually many colors, some of them incredibly bright and vivid. The overall effect of viewing these pieces felt meditative and soothing.  I stared at them from a distance and then up close over and over again and the longer I looked at them the more relaxed I felt, until tears came to my eyes. It's amazing work. 

Dansaekwha-LA-art-show
Dansaekwha-LA-art-show
Dansaekwha-close-up
Dansaekwha-LA-art-show

We moved on to another gallery and I was taken in by the bright geometric sculpture of  Rafael Barrios.    At first glance they looked like holograms or 3D cartoons popping out of the walls and i had to get quite close to them to verify that they are actually 3 dimensional forms. They were incredible. 

 (I didn't capture any decent photos at the show, but here's one of his sculptures, installed).

 (I didn't capture any decent photos at the show, but here's one of his sculptures, installed).

After the show, Brad and I wandered about LA for a couple of days and then a friend of mine visiting LA at the same time as me, scooped me up in her rental car. We left Brad in Silverlake to get his fill of yoga, good food and creative replenishment and drove south to go camping in Joshua Tree.  It was raining all day in LA and as we drove out of town, the clouds in the distance just seemed to be getting darker.  Along the highway we saw a flashing LED sign that read “Warning: FLASH FLOODS IN THIS AREA.” We laughed at this because the last time Natalie and I had gone camping, we were in southern Utah right after a huge flood that had basically closed down Arches National Park.

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We drove on and on, and when we finally reached Joshua Tree it was dark.  At the entrance of the park, we commented on how windy it was to the park ranger and he smiled and said, “Yep, and it’s only going to get windier! Better find a camp spot with some cover.” We asked him where this might be and off we headed, Joshua trees blowing in the wind as our headlights brushed over them in the darkness.  The road curved and went on and on and our map seemed to be mis-marked or something because nothing seemed to be lining up. The wind blew HARD against the car and we cackled in glee and sped down the winding road. We finally found the turnoff we were looking for, Hidden Valley Campground, We quickly found a campsite and parked with our headlights shining on our set up area.  There was a giant boulder, some large bushes and trees around the tent area and we nestled out little tent sideways between them all, threw everything in and drove back into town to find a bite to eat. 

We ate at the Joshua Tree Saloon, which was surprisingly good.  There were long haired, desert hipsters parked at some tables, old sun wrinkled men at the bar, a tall thin, a beautiful lady, clad in leather from head to toe sitting by herself in the corner and all kinds of other people.  I was surprised to see anyone out at all but the scene in this warm, saloon style, California bar was rather lively.  After we ate our dinner we headed back to our camp-spot.  It had started to lightly snow and the wind was howling by this time.  We climbed into our tent, figured out how to blow up our blow up pads and then, we hunkered down. The wind was sweeping over the boulder above us and whipping the trees wildly.  Coyotes were yipping in the distance. It was hard to sleep.  We laid there in silence, listening and listening and listening, the coyotes and wind taking turns at waking us up if we dozed off for a bit.  Eventually it was light out and we ran to the car, cranked up the heat and high-tailed it to the nearest coffee shop. 

Later that day after a hike, we drove around on the unpaved, sandy desert roads in our little Nissan checking out the abandoned shacks that spotted the landscape.  The further we drove the sandier the roads seemed to get and we had to floor it several times to get through some deep spots. We could hear the sand whooshing across the bottom of the car as we sailed over deep sand, laughing and screaming once or twice as the car caught air over hills, flomped down into the sandy washes, and harrumphed up the other side. 

 
The sleepless, desert-worn travelers.  

The sleepless, desert-worn travelers.  

The oasis we hiked to in the freezing cold wind. 

The oasis we hiked to in the freezing cold wind. 

 

The next day of we drove to Desert Hot Springs where Brad met up with us and we lounged about at Sam’s Family Spa, a 1950’s era hot mineral bathing spot.  There was a giant wood carving of "Sam" at the entrance to the spa that looked very much like a shirtless cowboy Buddha and we quickly purchased some white towels with an illustration of Sam standing under some palm trees, looking real chill.   There were four hot mineral baths, a cold pool and a heated swimming pool.  Most of the spa goers seemed like retired folks who must have lived nearby. We laid in the sun next to pool for the rest of the day, occasionally shifting our chairs into the light as the sun moved behind the trees.  

desert-hot-springs-sams-family-resort
Brad, soaking in the California rays. 

Brad, soaking in the California rays. 

**I had so many photos that I didn't get to include Brad's artwork in the LA art show. Check it out on his site!

Also, my amazing friend Natalie owns this special store in Asheville, NC called Villagers.  Check 'er out! 

Kinabuti, Nigeria's Best Ethical Fashion Label

There is nothing I enjoy more than doing work that is in line with my beliefs! If I can't get behind the brand, I don't really want to put my energy into making it a better brand. I truly believe in the goodness of people and think that from the food we eat, to the clothing we wear, we can make responsible decisions, and in doing so we strengthen communities instead of damaging them. I do my best to buy goods that ensure fair wages and working conditions because I believe our individual choices can create global change. This is the reason I started working with Kinabuti Fashion Initiative. The brand is part ethical fashion label part non-profit. (Ethical fashion is an approach to design, resources and manufacturing of clothing which which maximizes benefits to people and communities while minimizing the negative impact on the environment). The people at Kinabuti are constantly creating educational and community improvement programs to improve local economies in Nigeria. From the conception of the designs to the dying of the fabrics to the sewing of every stitch, Kinabuti brings empowerment, income and education to Nigerian communities. Here is a video I edited for them recently for their entry in the annual Fashion Crowd Challenge. The video was projected on the runway in Lagos and Milan and at other Kinabuti events. Kinabuti's outstanding clothing will be available in Utah during the Sundance Film Festival and will soon be available online.